Lady Bird

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WHAT IT'S ABOUT

An outspoken teen (Saoirse Ronan) must navigate a loving but turbulent relationship with her strong-willed mother (Laurie Metcalf) over the course of an eventful and poignant senior year of high school.

WHAT MAKES IT FEMINIST?

Lady Bird is a beautiful portrait of ordinary teenage angst and heartbreak.  Lady Bird finds herself on a constant trek to happiness, the kind that you can't seem to find at her age.  She feels heartbreak on so many relatable levels, strives to fit in with her wealthy classmates and takes all of her frustration out on her over-worked mother who just wants her to be the best version of herself she can be. There's no fancy plot line, there's no over-the-top characterization, its just a real story about a teenage girl who is trying to find herself.

Saoirse Ronan's performance as Lady Bird is beautiful and real, as she portrays a faltering teen who just wants to survive her senior year of high school, get in to a decent college, and figure out what she wants to do with her life.

Her fights with her mother are all too relatable, particularly on the college and "get your life together" front.  Those of us who have been through this phase of life and come out the other side want to shake her and tell her to stop being so mean to her mother, that she's just doing the best she knows how.

THE BEST PART

Lady Bird is directed by Greta Gerwig who just made history by being the first woman to be nominated for a Best Directing Oscar on her debut film.  The film is also nominated for four other Oscars as well as having done very well at other awards shows this season.  Not only is the film creating stories that are relatable to women, it's breaking down barriers in the film industry.